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Speech Difficulties in Children

View original article by Jessica Foster here

June 17, 2011

Contact:
Christa Dean Hild
850-747-6542

Panama City, Fla. - Not being able to make appropriate sounds, a limited vocabulary, and difficulty communicating are all issues that could signal a problem with a child's speech.

Peggy Kundo is a Speech Language Pathologist at Bay Medical's Healthplex.  She says, "Parents should look for how well a child says the sounds in their words."

Kundo uses techniques such as mouth exercises for weakness in the lips and tongue and a mirror to help children learn how to form sounds.  One of the latest techniques is incorporating literacy in all therapy, which means using books to help children improve their speech.

Kundo explains that professional help is usually needed to see results.

"Often it doesn't get better on their own.  It has consequences socially because they can't communicate with their peers...there are also academic consequences," she says.

Another clue that your child may need help with speech is if he or she is playing with toys inappropriately or pointing at something they want instead of asking for it.